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Offender debt recovery notices

The Queensland Government may give financial assistance to help a victim recover from a violent crime. We may then reclaim the money paid to the victim from the person convicted of the offence.

We only recover money if you are convicted in a Queensland court, and not when the matter is referred to the Mental Health Court. We are able to recover fines imposed by the court under the Victims of Crime Assistance Act 2009.

Recovery notice

When you are convicted of an act of violent crime, there is usually a debt to pay—even if you are a minor, or were a minor at the time of the crime. The decision to reclaim financial assistance payments is made separately to the sentence you receive after you are convicted.

After you are convicted, you will receive a recovery notice from the offender debt recovery program. The notice will explain why we are seeking to reclaim money from you.

Under the Victims of Crime Assistance Act, we may reclaim payments from you relating to either:

  • criminal injury compensation
  • financial assistance payments.

If you think the amount is too high, you can seek legal advice about appealing the court’s decision. You have 28 days to dispute the notice. For information about how to dispute a recovery notice, email offenderrecovery@justice.qld.gov.au or call 1300 856 721.

Liability notice

If you don't dispute the recovery notice, you will receive a liability notice. This notice tells you the amount you must pay and the date it is due (usually 28 days from the notice date). 

Enforcement order

If you don't pay the liability notice by the due date, your overdue payment will be sent to SPER. We will issue you with an enforcement order with a due date, by which you must either:

You can't have your debt converted into unpaid community service or a good behaviour order. We can’t waive or reduce the amount that must be paid on the grounds of financial hardship.

If you don't pay the debt, we may take enforcement action against you.

Read the common questions about offender debt recovery notices.

Last reviewed:
3 August 2017

 

 

 

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